6 Ways to Activate Your Block Area

Posted: August 7th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Child Care Providers, News | Tags: , , , , , | No Comments »

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Providing nontraditional materials for the block area invites children to test out new ways of balancing, stacking, building and creating structures. It can spark the interest of children who might not normally spend a lot of time with blocks or create opportunities for cooperative play as children explore a new material.

One classroom at Goodwill of Southern Indiana (an Excellence Academy center) provided a variety of colors and sizes of cups.  The children built elaborate walls, pyramids, arches and towers. They incorporated unit blocks to make doorways and roads. Every day they came up with new ways to use the cups, and the play continued for weeks as the children collaborated, tested and built.

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Want to get building in your classroom? Here is a list of 6 nontraditional materials to get you going:

1. Cups: Paper, plastic, foam or other, cups are versatile, accessible and cheap.

2. Paper Towel Rolls: Leave them whole to make tunnels and columns or cut them down the sides to make ramps.

3. Flat Rocks: Stacking rocks provides a great challenge of balance. Add some sticks and they can be used to turn a block structure into a nature scene.

4. Boxes: Small ones, large ones, leave them blank or decorate them to look like buildings. Just put a pile of boxes out and the children will know what to do!

5. Plastic Lids: Another great challenge in balancing, a variety of sizes of lids makes for interesting towers. They are also a great way to add circles to block designs.

6. Masking Tape: Place lengths of tape on the floor to make roads. Better yet, hand the tape over to the children and see what they create!

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Kindergarten Countdown!

Posted: February 26th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Child Care Providers, Event, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

Kindergarten Countdown Teaser Flyer 2014


Early Childhood Science

Posted: December 12th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: News, Science | Tags: , , , , , , , | No Comments »

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Share a Story on Make a Difference Day

Posted: October 15th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Child Care Providers, Event, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

Share a Story on Make a Difference Day


Gardening Grants for Child Care Programs

Posted: September 27th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Child Care Providers, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

National Gardening Association: Youth Garden Grants
The National Gardening Association (NGA), awards Youth Garden Grants to schools and community organizations throughout the U.S. with child-centered garden programs. Applicant schools and organizations must plan to garden with at least 15 children between the ages of 3 and 18. Twenty programs will receive a $500 gift certificate to the Gardening with Kids online store. Each program will also receive a tool package from Ames, plant starts from Bonnie Plants, and a seed donation from High Mowing Seeds. The selection of winners is based on the demonstrated relationship between the garden program and education related to the environment, health and nutrition issues, character education, and entrepreneurship in the United States. The application deadline is December 6, 2013. Application guidelines and forms are available on the NGA website.  Click here for more information.


Five Creative and Fun Ways to Get Children’s Attention

Posted: September 4th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: News, Susan's Blog | Tags: , , , , , , , | No Comments »
1191196_students__3When you’re working with a group of children it can be a challenge to get their attention without sounding like a drill sergeant. Leah Davies M.Ed. has collected 25 great ideas that classroom teachers can use that are not only effective but fun! Here are the first 5:

 

 1. Hold up your hand and say, “Give Me Five.” The children put their hands in the air and shout “five!” As they count down to one, they get progressively quieter until “one” is said in a whisper. Or, after saying, “Give me five,” everyone puts their hand in the air and counts loudly using their fingers from 1 to 5.

 

2. Teach the children that the five fingers on their right hand stand for the five things they must do when you hold up your hand. Say, “Give me five,” and wait until all the children hold up their hand. Then lead them in saying the five things together.
  1. Eyes — look
  2. Ears — listen
  3. Mouth — closed
  4. Hands — still
  5. Feet — quiet

Later when you say, “Give me five,” the children are to think of these five things and hold up their hand to show they are ready to listen.

3. Clap or tap in a pattern, for example, clap slowly twice and then clap fast three times. The students are to stop what they are doing and repeat the pattern. If necessary, do it again until all children have responded and are quiet. You may want to vary the pattern.

4. Shake a shaker, touch a wind chime, ring a bell, play quiet music or use any kind of sound maker as a signal for students to be attentive.

5. Raise your hand and stand still until the students are quiet. Or, raise your right hand and put the index finger of your left hand on your lips. The children are to do the same. Another idea is to hold up three fingers which is a silent signal for “Stop, look, listen.” Then wait until all the children have their three fingers up and are quiet.

Susan A. Vessels
Executive Director
Community Coordinated Child Care (4-C)

Can you snap your fingers?

Posted: July 19th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Child Care Providers, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

Children begin processing new skills at early ages.


Foster Grandparent Volunteers Needed

Posted: June 11th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Child Care Providers, News | Tags: , , , , | No Comments »

1117237_old_farmer_and_childrenIf you are 55, or older, and wish to share your experience and compassion with children, then become a Louisville Metro Foster Grandparent!

Foster Grandparents are role models, mentors, and friends. They provide one-on-one tutoring, help children to read, assist with homework and help to guide children at a critical time in their lives. They share their time and give the kind of comfort and love that sets a child on the path toward a successful future.

Foster Grandparents have to be income eligible and serve up to 20 hours per week. In return, you’ll receive a tax-free, hourly stipend ,transportation reimbursement, pre-service orientation, training from the organization where you serve, and supplemental accident and liability insurance while on duty.

For more information or to apply, visit http://www.louisvilleky.gov/CSR/Community+Services/Foster+Grandparent+Program.htm

or contact:

Louisville Metro Foster Grandparent Program
810 Barret Ave, 3rd floor
Louisville, KY 40204
502-574-1933

 

 


Kindergarten Countdown

Posted: May 28th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Child Care Providers, Event, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

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Nothing to put your eye out here.

Posted: December 14th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: News, Susan's Blog | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

Unlike the Red Ryder BB gun in the classic A Christmas Story, the toys suggested by the folks at Not Just Cute will safely delight your child while teaching school readiness skills. But, shhh, don’t tell them they’re learning math,  reading and writing skills.  Just watch and enjoy.

Susan A. Vessels
Executive Director





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